An exemplar of low carbon residential development and mixed use placemaking


ENGIE is redeveloping the former 1GW coal fired power station at Rugeley, Staffordshire, as an exemplar of low carbon residential development and mixed use placemaking. The scheme, which incorporates 2,300 new, low carbon homes, 1.2 hectares of retail and community space, 5 hectares of office and commercial space, as well as new schools and other infrastructure, was granted planning consent in early 2020 following extensive community engagement and is designed to meet the aspirations of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The development has also been selected as one of the UK Government’s “Smart Local Energy Systems” demonstrator projects and will incorporate a smart low carbon energy system for the new development, which will also extend out to the existing wider Rugeley conurbation.

The challenge

To re-imagine and re-develop a former coal fired power station site – the embodiment of the carbon intensive economy – as an exemplar of a low carbon residential development and mixed use placemaking for the net zero era.

The solution

Planning consent has been achieved for 2,300 low carbon homes, 1.2 hectares of retail and community space, 5 hectares of office and commercial space, as well as new schools and other infrastructure.

The impact (including cost savings/income generated if applicable)

The project is significantly larger in scale than most other sustainable housing developments attempted in the UK. As such, it will make a significant contribution to the UK’s aspirations to decarbonise its housing stock and to realise its overall goal of reducing all greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

How is the new approach being sustained?

ENGIE has worked extensively with local communities, Cannock Chase and Lichfield District Councils, Staffordshire County Council and the West Midlands Combined Authority to develop a scheme which meets the aspirations of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and the needs of local people.

Lessons learned

The importance of deep and early engagement with local communities and stakeholders in the placemaking process. Additionally, the importance of integrating energy systems master planning alongside spatial planning, urban design and housing design.

Contact Chris Langdonchris.langdon@engie.com

Links to relevant documentshttp://www.rugeleypower.com/