Performance indicators: measuring the contribution of culture and sport to the economy

These are suggestions of how to measure the economic contribution of culture and sport to better economic outcomes.

Not all of these suggestions will be relevant to your local outcomes. You should select a small number of indicators from across the different levels that together best measure the contribution of culture and sport to your service, intermediate and overarching strategic outcomes.

You should draw on available data from existing sources within your local council and also work to ensure that you align outcomes to your local enterprise partnership (LEP).  LEP's are led by local authorities and businesses across natural economic areas. They provide the vision, knowledge and strategic leadership needed to drive sustainable private sector growth and job creation in their area. You can find out more about LEP's at the link below.

Local enterprise partnerships – on the BIS website

A step-by-step guide to selecting performance indicators.

Overarching strategic outcome indicators

These are high-level non-cultural or sport indicators that you want to demonstrate, and can evidence, culture and sport contribute towards. Your overarching strategic outcome indicators should reflect those found in high level documents that set out the overall responsibilities of your local council and its major partners.

Examples include:

  • Percentage of:
    - small businesses in an area showing employment growth 
    - working age population in adult apprenticeships
    - working age population on out-of-work benefits
    - working age population qualified to at least Level 3
    - 16 to 18-year-olds who are not in education, training or employment (NEET)
    - young people from disadvantaged backgrounds who go on to higher education by age 19.
  • Local take-up of the Young Apprenticeship programme
  • Overall employment rate
  • New business registration rate
  • Income and expenditure on business improvement districts
  • Level of inward investment.

Intermediate outcome indicators

These should include indicators that reflect the specific contribution of culture and sport to the intermediate outcomes.

Examples include:

  • Percentage of: 
    - children or young people who agree that participation in a culture or sport project, activity or event has helped improve their concentration or behaviour, or helped them be more interested in classes or do better at school
    - participants who agree that culture and sport projects, activities or events  have helped develop their life skills (team-working, communication or social skills) or basic skills (reading, writing or ICT) or confidence
    - young people and adults who agree that participating, volunteering or training opportunities in culture and sport projects, activities or events helped them get into or stay in education, training or employment
    - local people who agree that culture and leisure provision is important to the viability of their town centre
    - public culture and sport assets and facilities run by local community organisations
  • Economic benefits of active travel (walking and cycling) interventions
  • Number of full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs supported by the culture and sport visitor economy.
  • Percentage of creative businesses operating for three years or more
  • Level of business investment in culture and sport.

Intermediate outcome indicators may also include non-cultural or sporting indicators that are short- to medium-term ‘proxy' measures for the overarching strategic outcomes.

Examples include:

  • Percentage of (unemployed) young people and adults participating in regular volunteering
  • Number of new mutuals and cooperatives created to deliver public services
  • Percentage of public assets and facilities run by civil society organisations or small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)
  • Total number of tourists or first-time visitors to the area
  • Growth in tourism per year and visitor spend (£ million).

Service outcome indicators

These are indicators specific to culture and sport.

Examples include:

  • Percentage of: 
    - total income from culture and sport facilities and events that is earned income 
    - increase in jobs in the creative economy 
    - participants in formal or informal cultural and sport learning opportunities who achieve accreditation or qualifications
    - users satisfied with culture and sport provision in their local area
    - culture and sport facilities and services achieving nationally or internationally recognised accreditation standards or design awards 
    - tourists who include culture and sport facilities or events among their reasons for visiting 
    - young people and adults regularly volunteering in culture or sport.
  • Gross value added (GVA) of the culture and sport sector and or creative economy (per head of population)
  • Contribution per year of the culture and sport sector or creative economy to the UK economy as measured by gross domestic product (GDP).

Where possible, indicators should be broken down further, for example, by geographic area or target wards or by specific groups, such as different age groups or disadvantaged or vulnerable groups. They can also be broken down to differentiate in-house, commissioned or external provision.

Service output indicators

These indicators are also specific to culture and sport.

Examples include:

  • Net expenditure on culture and sport provision per head of population
  • Number of person days of employment bought by culture and sport capital projects
  • Value of goods and or services purchased by culture and sport providers from local businesses or people
  • Number in employment, education or training with local culture and sport businesses or providers
  • Number of historic buildings brought back into use
  • Total number of attendances, visits or participants in culture and sport (per 1,000 population)
  • Number of participants in culture and sport volunteering schemes
  • Percentage of users satisfied with specific culture and sport facilities, services or events.

Where possible, indicators should be broken down further, for example, by geographic area or target wards or by specific groups, such as different age groups or disadvantaged or vulnerable groups. They can also be broken down to differentiate in-house, commissioned or external provision.


Page updated May 2012.

 

27 June 2012

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