Supporting adults with a learning disability to have better lives framework: launch and introductory session, 26 January 2022

Download the presentation from this event.


Supporting adults with a learning disability to have better lives framework was commissioned by the LGA and the Association of Directors of Adult Services (ADASS). 

LGA and ADASS logos

Launch and introductory session

  • Introduction: Simon Williams, Director of Social Care Improvement, LGA/ADASS Care and Health Improvement Programme (CHIP)
  • Simon Froud, Director of Adult Social Care, (North) Essex Country Council representing ADASS
  • Co-chairs: David Burns, Citizen Checkers CIC and Claire Bruin, Care and Health Improvement Adviser, East of England and Learning Disability Programme lead (CHIP)
  • David Burns, Citizen Checkers CIC: The importance of co-producing with people with a learning disability
  • The framework and how councils can use it: Rob Griffiths and Dan Short, Alder Advice

Webinar video

Questions and answers from the “Supporting adults with learning disabilities to have better lives framework webinar - launch and introductory session on 26 January 26 2022

1. Will this presentation be sent to attendees?
Yes.

2. Will the recording be sent out after with the resources?
Yes, it will.

3. Is there a link to a place that we can access the tool?
Yes, here are links to the introductory page and the framework. The framework can be found in a web area on the LGA website.

4. Is there any easy read information on the framework available?
Yes, it will be available shortly. It is being developed at the moment.

5. Would somebody be able to come and present the framework to our Learning Disability Partnership Board? 
To find out more about the support we can offer in using this framework please email chip@local.gov.uk and a member of the team will be in touch to discuss this request.

6. I am the brother of a learning-disabled man. How were people like me involved?
This outcomes and improvement framework was commissioned by the LGA and the Association of Directors of Adult Services (ADASS) from Alder Advice working with a steering group including sector led improvement staff, a Director of Adult Social Services (DASS), experienced staff from the learning disability sector and a representative of family carers of people with a learning disability.

Despite the pandemic lockdown which stopped some of the planned meetings with people with a learning disability and their families, Alder Advice were able to meet with several people with a learning disability and their carers by video conference and their views were used in the development of the tool. 

7. Will all Councils (ASS) be using the Framework? In other words, is this voluntary? Is this mandatory for Local Authorities and Health services to complete?
It is voluntary however LGA and ADASS both support the framework, and we are making sure that all councils know about this framework, and we will continue to publicise the framework and the support available from CHIP (Care and Health Improvement Programme) to implement the framework via ADASS regional networks and other ongoing publicity.

8. Is there a suggested timeframe that the framework works best in? and 22. Can you give an approximate time scale for how long the self-evaluation could take?
Each council is different and starts in a different place so timeframes will be different for a council. However, from pilot work we know that a council can complete a self-evaluation in 3 to 6 months. 

The tool is in two parts: a quick “overview” self-evaluation followed by in-depth assessments of specific areas. The time taken to complete the overview depends on the availability of data (some councils will find these easier than others) and a process of engagement with people with lived experience. The overview assessment is intended to be relatively easy and quick to complete. The process is illustrated on one of the slides in the webinar presentation.

The overview assessment  will help the council to identify priority areas for follow up with additional data and questions. Each of the individual in depth areas can be undertaken on their own, or with others, as resources allow.

9. You mentioned a few councils that are good examples - so how will you be encouraging and making all LAs (Local authorities) aware of the framework? Especially those that are not yet good examples?
We are making sure that all councils know about this framework, and we will continue to publicise the framework and the support available from CHIP (Care and Health Improvement Programme) to implement the framework via ADASS regional networks and other ongoing publicity.

10. I see strengths based mentioned, but we should go a step further and celebrate the strengths people have and recognise the contribution they can make to our workforce and communities?
Yes, we should celebrate what people with a learning disability contribute to their communities and our workforce. The importance of doing this is included in the framework.  In section of the framework 5. Enabling the care and support system the description of good includes references to support for an employment pathway for adults with a learning disability and opportunities for councils to operate their own scheme to directly employ adults with a learning disability including, but not limited to, roles as experts by experience with monitoring of actual employment rates. The framework also encourages assessment and care management functions to routinely consider every individual’s employment options.

11. Is there any focus on asset-based community development within the framework?
This section of the framework 5. Enabling the care and support system says, “They (councils) encourage the asset building in the community and development of the local market to offer innovative approaches in responsive innovative support plans and support the use of personal budgets.”

12. ”Is there any sense in the framework of how to hand over some responsibility and power to people with learning disabilities and their families and away from ASC departments? How are people supported to plan for themselves to shape their own future and then go to ASC for advice and resources when needed? 
For example this section of the framework 3. Systems leadership, governance and management arrangements says, “The best councils collaborate with adults with learning disability, their carers, and with partners from across the care, support, health, and housing system to co-produce innovative approaches to improve the lives of adults with learning disability. They encourage and enable all parts of the system to make reasonable adjustments so support can be made accessible to adults with learning disability” and “They encourage and support personalisation of support and facilitate innovation and promote the use of direct payments, individual service funds, managed accounts and individual health budgets and the systems that support these.”

13. We have known all this since Valuing People and Valuing People now. Could we stop writing frameworks and just get on with making it happen! I like the principle around people with a learning disability determining their own future and co lead in transforming services to do this well we need to support and encourage the development of self-advocacy groups people need to feel strong and resilient to speak up and be heard.
Self-advocacy and co -production opportunities are especially important. One of the case studies from the framework emphasises the importance of people with a learning disability themselves evaluating services. Leeds 'Good Lives Leaders', several of the experts by experience that we spoke to stress the importance of evaluating services from the perspective of people with a learning disability, and particularly seeking the opinions of those who use them.

14. Will this apply to those adults who are in support living situations?
Yes.

15. Can I clarify that this tool and framework is for people with a learning disability who may / may not have ASD - but that it is not appropriate for people with ASD / NDD who do not have a learning disability?
The framework is principally aimed at addressing services for adults with a learning disability and young people preparing for adulthood. This includes autistic people who also have a learning disability. It does not include autistic people without a learning disability, as they are likely to have different needs.

16. How much overlap is there between this Framework and the Autism Framework?
The framework is principally aimed at addressing services for adults with a learning disability and young people preparing for adulthood. This includes autistic people who also have a learning disability. It does not include autistic people without a learning disability, as they are likely to have different needs.

17. Autism without an associated learning disability has been excluded - is this going to be worked on?
CHIP (Care and Health Improvement Programme) offers support to councils in relation to their services for autistic people. Further information can be found on the page, Support for autistic people.

18. Given the challenges with recruitment and retention across social care, how will we ensure that the aspirations of the model can be achieved?
Section 6 of the framework , “Supporting the Care and Support Workforce” addresses staffing issues.

CHIP (Care and Health Improvement Programme) recognises that the workforce challenge councils and providers face is significant at the moment. We are working hard with partners to support councils with workforce challenges. Find out more about the support we offer on social care workforce issues .

19. Will outcomes be specific to the person? I hope bespoke outcome plans will be made for each person instead of council led outcome plans.
Each person with care and support needs should have an outcome focused care, support and treatment plan. This is good strengths-based practice. In section 4. Understanding demand, prevention, and early intervention the framework says councils should, “Make co-produced individual plans so each person can be as independent in adulthood as is feasible. This includes consideration of employment/higher education, independent living, participation in society, relationships, good health and ongoing care and support.”

Councils can also develop strategic outcomes that represent their ambitions for people with a learning disability and monitor these. 

20. What considerations to ensure the right balance is struck. For instance, I have a brother with special needs and, if asked, his aspirations would be to win on his PS5 and does not have any real appreciation of the outside world with regards to work, or what 'safe' looks like.
A good strengths-based assessment will help the person to explore what is possible for them and could offer opportunities to expand their experience and world view.

Section 7 of the framework: 7. Supporting adults with learning disabilities and/or autism to stay safe. This section of the framework talks about the difficult balance between keeping people safe and avoiding being risk averse.

21. Where does the use of technology to improve lives and autonomy (and just as part of normal life and skills) fit in? Are there any specific references to technology woven through the tool and resources?
This section of the framework 5. Enabling the care and support system says, “The council “routinely consider the use of assistive and other technologies during the support planning process to facilitate achievement of outcomes and to manage risks. There is access to staff who have been trained in the use of personalised technologies to help people live the lives they want to.”

Find out more about the CHIP (Care and Health Improvement Programme) support to councils to transform services with the use of technology.

22. I would be interested in how this will dovetail with NHSE's Homes not Hospital's programme.
The framework sets expectations that local authorities will work in partnership with other agencies, including health, housing, support providers and the voluntary and community sector, and with people with lived experience and their families to develop appropriate housing and support to enable people to have fulfilling lives. This includes the joint work required to deliver Building the Right Support and the Home’s not Hospital's programme. The framework emphasises the importance of leadership in ensuring collaborative and partnership working to improve the lives of people with a learning disability. So even though the target audience for the framework is councils, it is designed to be useful across the whole system, so we hope it would be entirely consistent with this NHS programme.

23. Are LAs going to be asked to publish the results of completing the Framework?
This is a self-evaluation tool and councils are encouraged to work with the local community of people with learning disability and with families and carers to undertake a self-evaluation. It will be for the council to decide how it shares the messages from undertaking a self-evaluation.

24. How does this framework fit with the new CQC (Care Quality Commission) Inspection framework for Adult Care?
It is hard to say right now as the assurance system for adult social care is not in place yet however this framework will be helpful for councils getting their services ready for assurance.

25. Are there tools that have been used to monitor services, that can be shared?
We have developed survey tools and data templates to assist councils in carrying out a self-assessment. This approach helps councils to reflect on current system service delivery before developing a transformation action plan. To find out more about the support we can offer in using this framework please email chip@local.gov.uk and a member of the team will be in touch.

26. In relation to the rights model as opposed medical model what are people’s thoughts on the Down Syndrome Bill?
The LGA position on the Down Syndrome Bill and briefings: Down Syndrome Bill, Committee Stage, House of Commons, 26 January 2022