Lichfield District Council

Lichfield District Council’s vision is to be a strong and flexible council that delivers good value, quality services. We want to support a vibrant and prosperous economy, healthy and safe communities and clean, green and welcoming places to live.


Is it ensuring local people have access to good local homes? Are you passionate about boosting recycling rates? Do you want to ensure local parks and open spaces are protected and better used? Or are you committed to helping local businesses thrive?

Lichfield District Council’s vision is to be a strong and flexible council that delivers good value, quality services. We want to support a vibrant and prosperous economy, healthy and safe communities and clean, green and welcoming places to live.

To support this vision, we need engaged and passionate councillors to be the eyes, ears and voices of our communities, to help solve local problems and represent ward needs and interests in council decisions – we know we can only be as effective, in touch and driven as the people who are elected to run the council, so we need councillors who are capable, energetic and engaged, with a commitment to local people and a passion for change.

Perhaps you are already involved in local affairs and want to take the next step. Or you may be looking for a worthwhile and rewarding way to help your local community.

Decisions made by councillors affect the lives of everyone in the area in countless ways. Representing a population of over 100,000 across the district, understanding the issues and concerns they face, and helping to drive forward action are the most important tasks that any councillor undertakes. 

About Lichfield District Council

Local councillors are the elected representatives of Lichfield District.

There are 47 councillors who represent 26 wards across Lichfield City, Burntwood, and rural areas, stretching from Colton and Handsacre in the north, through to Wiggington and Clifton Campville in the east, Chase Terrace and Chasetown in the west, and Little Aston and Canwell in the south.

Some wards are represented by three councillors, and others are represented by just one or two councillors.

Representing people in Lichfield District, understanding the issues and concerns they face, and helping to drive forward action are the most important tasks that any councillor undertakes. Significantly, it is also often the role that local people value most.

Current make-up of the council and its current councillors

How do I become a councillor in Lichfield?

To become a councillor you have to stand at local elections and compete with other candidates to gain the most votes from the local electorate.

You do not have to belong to or represent a political party to stand in the elections. You can stand as an Independent Candidate or choose not to have a description to your name. If you choose to stand for a party you will need to go through their selection process before you can be put forward as their candidate. Get in touch for support with independent politics or party politics.

Does Lichfield pay councillors?

Councillors are not paid a salary but they are entitled to receive a ‘basic allowance’, which is intended to recognise the time devoted to their work on behalf of the people of Lichfield and in connection with council business. Each council sets its own rate for councillors’ allowances.

What support will I receive from Lichfield?

Lichfield District Council is committed to providing councillors with advice and support for all aspects of their role.

After an election, all new councillors have the opportunity to attend induction and training sessions to enable them to meet key people, familiarise themselves with the work of the council, and understand the expectations of councillors and ways in which they can carry out key tasks.

Councillors are also provided with ongoing learning and development support to broaden their knowledge, skills and confidence.

The full range of induction, training and support on offer, along with key contacts, is outlined in a welcome pack provided to each new councillor, and on the council’s intranet, so that you can always be in touch with the latest opportunities.

What support is available from Lichfield District Council for councillors with disabilities?

Councillors are encouraged to contact the member services team following their election to discuss their personal needs so that reasonable adjustments can be made.

Electoral ward maps for Lichfield District Council

Map showing the electoral wards in Lichfield District Council

Eligibility

You can be a councillor as long as you are:

  • British or a citizen of the Commonwealth or European Union
  • At least 18 years old
  • Registered to vote in the area or have lived, worked or owned property there for at least 12 months before an election.

If you are in any doubt about whether you are eligible to stand as a councillor, you should contact the electoral services department at your local council for advice.

You can’t be a councillor if you:

  • Work for the council you want to be a councillor for, or for another local authority in a political restricted post
  • Are the subject of a bankruptcy restrictions order or interim order
  • Have been sentenced to prison for three months or more (including suspended sentences) during the five years before election day
  • Have been convicted of a corrupt or illegal practice by an election court.
What next?

In order to stand at the elections you must first get a set of nomination papers from the electoral services team at Lichfield District Council, which will explain the nomination process. 

These packs are available from the electoral services team nearer the election date (usually in March). A candidates and agents briefing will also be held to provide further information to prospective candidates about standing for election. 

Electoral services team, contact details

Tel: 01543 308125 
Email: elections@lichfielddc.gov.uk

Next steps

To become a councillor you have to put yourself forward at local elections and compete with other candidates to gain the most votes.

Below are some of the most important steps to consider.

  1. Find out when the next local government elections are in your area by checking with your local council.
  2. Make sure you are registered on the electoral role with your local council.
  3. If you are interested in independent politics (not a political party), you can get resources and advice from the Local Government Association’s Independent Office and the Independent Campaign CornerAs an independent, you will also need to start working out your views on local issues and services.
  4. To stand for a political party, you’ll need to be a member of the party, get involved locally and go through their selection process before you can be put forward as their candidate for election. You can find out more on each party’s website. This can take up to about a year or more, so please contact your political party as soon as you can. You can also contact the Local Government Association (LGA) political offices
  5. Almost anyone can be a councillor but to check that you are eligible 
  6. Hear from real councillors about what it’s like being a councillor and their tips and inspiration 
  7. Get in touch with a councillor to find out more with an informal chat (or ask us to help)
  8. Watch the Be a Councillor film 
  9. Use our Be a Councillor worksheets to see how you would handle some real situations as a councillor 
  10. Explore, research and keep up to date about your local area, different communities, services, issues and ideas.
  11. Attend council meetings and local events to find out more about local government and your community.
  12. Read the guidance from the Electoral Commission about the processes and forms to fill out to put yourself forward for election. To become nominated as a candidate at a local government election in England, you need to submit a completed set of nomination papers to the place fixed by the Returning Officer by 4pm on the 19th working day before the poll.
  13. Contact the Democratic Services team at your council to get the necessary paperwork, find out the deadlines, and see what help they can give to submit your papers. Find your local council.
  14. You will need to get 10 people (in the ward where you wish to stand) to sign your nomination papers.
  15. Build your local profile, reputation and campaign. Find out more about campaigning from the Local Government Association’s Independent Office, your political party, or the Electoral Commission.
Key dates

Council meetings are usually held in the evening starting at 6pm but can occasionally occur during the day. 

Council’s calendar of meetings

Useful contacts

Be a Councillor Email: beacouncillor@local.gov.uk

Lichfield District Council

Electoral Services
01543 308125
elections@lichfielddc.gov.uk 

 

Electoral Commission
0333 1031928
pef@electoralcommission.org.uk
www.electoralcommission.org.uk

Common questions about being a councillor

Frequently asked questions about being a councillor