Tackling tuberculosis: local government's public health role

Local authority staff have essential frontline roles to play in TB control – whether this is identifying symptoms, advising health and social care professionals, appropriate infection control, responding to TB incidents and outbreaks in settings such as schools, and ensuring that they themselves are also protected and screened if needed.


The UK has one of the highest incidence rates of tuberculosis (TB) of any Western European country and is working hard to change this. 

TB is a preventable and treatable disease that disproportionately affects vulnerable and disadvantaged populations. Certain groups, such as migrants, ethnic minority groups, and those with social risk factors such as homelessness or a history of imprisonment are more affected. Action is required to ensure that best practice in prevention, control and treatment is delivered to all communities across the country.

Local authority staff have essential frontline roles to play in TB control – whether this is identifying symptoms, advising health and social care professionals, appropriate infection control, responding to TB incidents and outbreaks in settings such as schools, and ensuring that they themselves are also protected and screened if needed.

The burden of TB in each local authority (provided in the Annex) and what action they and local government can take to control TB are presented in this document. 

Local government has an important responsibility to ensure that the wider social determinants of TB are addressed, and that people affected by the disease are supported to take their treatment. Many of the actions needed to eliminate TB require strengthened and integrated local services as TB does not exist in isolation from other health and social concerns.

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Published by:
LGA
Reference code:
22.22