Case studies

Innovation in local government is about improving the lives of the people in our communities. Browse through our case studies to see the many innovative programmes councils are involved in.

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Improvements for fostering enquiries and approvals

In the 2017/18 financial year, North East Lincolnshire Council followed the national trend of low fostering recruitment. In this year, our council approved just four foster carers. Using insights gathered with the public we were able to identify barriers and misconceptions that may be stopping individuals from pursuing fostering as a career and then tailor our messages around these findings.

Brighton and Hove: the benefits of a specialist teenage midwife

In Brighton a specialist teenage midwife is funded to work with young mothers. The midwife is able to see her clients more regularly than normal, providing valuable support that benefits this group during their pregnancy.

Cheshire West and Chester: spreading the skills of the Family Nurse Partnership team

Family nurses have been using their skills to train up the wider workforce in support of young parents and families. So far over 100 staff, including health visitors, school nurses and early years workers, have been supported. This case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.

Cornwall: helping the most in need

Cornwall Council has commissioned a service to work with all young parents. For those with the most complex needs, such as those with a history of domestic abuse and child protection issues, there is a range of bespoke support available. This case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.

Dudley: helping teenage mothers quit smoking

The Family Nurse Partnership service has revamped its approach to smoking cessation by giving staff extra training and testing kits to improve the support they offer pregnant women. It seems to be working – twice as many are giving up by 36 weeks than were previously. This case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.

Merton: helping young parents access children's centres

The London Borough of Merton has encouraged its Family Nurse Partnership and health visiting service to work closely with local children’s centres. It has seen the number of young parents using the centres rapidly increase. This case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.

North Yorkshire: a specialist young parents health visiting service

A young parenting programme has been set up in North Yorkshire, led by specialist health visitors. It helps provide comprehensive one-to-one support for young parents and is filling an important gap following the decommissioning of the Family Nurse Partnership service. his case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.

Walsall: helping young mothers stay in education

Walsall’s teenage pregnancy team works hard to keep its schoolaged clients in education. The team liaises closely with teachers to support pupils – and last year helped two-thirds stay in school. This case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.

West Sussex: providing support to those that do not qualify for FNP

West Sussex County Council has set up a young parents pathway to complement the work of the Family Nurse Partnership. The service is able to support young parents who would not normally qualify for FNP help. This case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.

Working with young fathers

In Salford and Gateshead, projects have been run to support young fathers and help them deal with the challenges they face. This case study is an example of the work that councils are doing to support young parents.