Combined authorities


What is a combined authority (CA)?

A combined authority (CA) is a legal body set up using national legislation that enables a group of two or more councils to collaborate and take collective decisions across council boundaries. It is far more robust than an informal partnership or even a joint committee. The creation of a CA means that member councils can be more ambitious in their joint working and can take advantage of powers and resources devolved to them from national government. While established by Parliament, CAs are locally owned and have to be initiated and supported by the councils involved.

Where have CAs already been established?

Nine combined authorities have been established so far (of which seven have secured devolution deals and six have in place directly elected mayors). Details of all powers and funding that have been devolved to individual areas can be found on the Devolution Register, as well as on the individual CA sites:

No directly elected mayor

In November 2017, the Government announced it had agreed a ‘minded to’ devolution deal with the North of Tyne authorities (Newcastle City Council, North Tyneside Council and Northumberland County Council) which will be subject to the consent of local partners. Further details on devolution to the North of Tyne area can be found here.


Learn more about CAs
 

The creation of a CA means that member councils can be more ambitious in their joint working and can take advantage of powers and resources devolved to them from national government. While established by Parliament, CAs are locally owned and have to be initiated and supported by the councils involved. 


Combined authorities explained