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Appendix A - combined NEOST and employer link subscriber results

The Government published the School Teachers' Review Body (STRB) remit on 16 November, asking for pay recommendations for all teachers and school leaders in 2023/24.


Introduction

The Government published the School Teachers' Review Body (STRB) remit on 16 November, asking for pay recommendations for all teachers and school leaders in 2023/24. The remit highlighted that the aim should be to promote recruitment and retention, whilst taking into account the Government’s commitment to uplift starting salaries to £30,000 by 2023 and considering cost pressures facing both the school system as a whole and individual schools. The remit focuses particular importance on having regard to the Government’s inflation target (2 per cent) when forming recommendations.

The STRB has also been invited to offer an initial view on areas within the STRB’s scope which would most benefit from future exploration to support the shared aim of providing a coherent and fulfilling career path for teachers and leaders.

The LGA, in its role as secretariat for NEOST, consulted stakeholders via an online survey (with one response allowed per organisation) which was launched in November and closed on 19 December 2022.

The survey questions aimed to extract evidence (including anecdotal evidence and estimates in the absence of facts or research) to inform the NEOST response back to the STRB with the aim of influencing the STRB recommendations.

Appendix A provides a copy of the survey questions used.
TOTAL NUMBER OF RESPONSES TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION 102
Local Authority Responses 64
Employer Link Responses  38

 

Questions 1 and 2 asked respondents for their organisation and email addresses.

PAY POLICY

Q3. In previous surveys the vast majority of LAs have signalled in principle, support for the proposed £30k starting salary by 2023, and we want to test if this is still the case. Therefore, do you support a £30k starting salary for teachers in 2023, in line with the Government’s current pay policy.

The number of responses to the question of teachers having a starting salary of £30k, in line with the Government's current policy.
Yes  96 responses (94%)
No 2 responses (2%)
Don't Know 4 responses (4%)

 

Q4. Should the 2023/24 pay award be applied to all ranges equally (i.e. a uniform percentage uplift) or should it be applied in a targeted way to address any recruitment and retention pressures? (Please note the proposed increase in the starting salary for the pay range in England from £28,000 to £30,000 equates to a 7.14% increase)

The number of responses to the question of should the 2023/24 pay award be applied equally to all ranges.
Yes, pay award to be applied to all ranges equally 31 responses (30%)
No, pay award to be applied in a targeted way to address any recruitment and retention pressures.  22 responses (22%)
No, graduated increases on the main pay range, to accommodate the £30k starting salary and a headline figure for M6 and all other pay ranges as in STPCD 2022. 37 responses (36%)
Other 9 responses (9%)
Left Blank  3 responses (3%)

 

If you responded OTHER to Question 4, please explain

Please See APPENDIX C FOR COMMENTS

Q6. if a targeted approach is taken, which pay range(s) should be the priority?

The number of responses to which pay range(s) should be the priority
Leadership Range 5 responses (5%)
Leading Practitioner 0
Upper Pay Range 3 responses (3%)
Main Pay Range 32 responses (31%)
Early Careers Teachers 16 responses (16%)
Unqualified Teachers  2 responses (2%)
Other  12 responses (12%)
Left Blank 32 responses (31%)

 

Q7. If you responded OTHER to Question 6, please explain below:

Please See APPENDIX C FOR COMMENTS

Q8. When thinking about recruitment and retention of good teachers and leaders,` what pay progression model would your schools prefer to operate?

The number of responses to the question of what pay progression model should be chosen for good teachers and leaders
Option A: Automatic pay progression within a pay range, subject to good performance. 73 responses (72 %)
Option B: Pay directly linked to an individual teacher/leader’s performance i.e. PRP 21 responses (21%)
Other 4 responses (4%)
Don't Know 3 responses (3%)
Left Blank  1 response (1%)

 

Q9. What are the main reasons for your choice to Question 8 if you selected Option A? Please select one and then go to Question 11.

The number of responses as to what were the main reasons for the choice to Question 8
Process seen as supporting the R & R of good teachers and leaders and seen as “fair” and transparent 60 responses (59%)
Best affordable model i.e. not enough money in the school’s budget to adequately fund pay differentials based on individual’s performance. 3 responses (3%)
Reduce unnecessary bureaucracy 19 responses (19%)
Left Blank  20 responses (20%)

 

Q10. What are the main reasons for your choice to Question 8 if you selected Option B. Please select one.

The number of responses to the question of what are the main reasons for your choice to Question 8 if you selected Option B.
Process that helps to drive improved performance within existing budgets. 11 responses (15%)
Process that enables appropriate challenge of poor performance. 8 responses (11%)
Process that balances resource input against likely benefits for the school teacher. 4 responses (6%)
Left Blank  48 responses (68%)

 

School finances - affordability

(These questions focussed on impact, affordability, and budgeting)

You may wish to consider:

  1. The autumn statement announced that schools will receive £2bn in extra funding for 2023/24, which we understand to be new money for schools. The Institute for Fiscal Studies have said that it would allow schools to return to at least 2010 levels in real terms, representing a 4% increase in school funding for 2023-24.
  2. Balanced against the current and forecast rates of inflation, in particular, the potential further increases in energy costs and the future school support staff pay award for 2023 in the context of the current schools AT/LA budget position.

Q11. What is your LA/AT recommendations for schools to budget (expressed as an overall percentage uplift) – in respect of any estimated 2023/24 teachers’ pay award.

The number of responses to the question about what is your LA/AT recommendations for schools to budget.
0-0.99% 1 response (1%)
1 – 1.99% 0
2 – 2.99% 22 responses (22%)
3 – 3.99% 36 responses (35%)
4 – 4.99% 17 responses (17%)
5%+ 20 responses (20%)
Left Blank 26 responses (6%)

 

Q12. What would your LA/AT generally consider to be affordable for all schools in your area (expressed as an overall percentage uplift) in respect of any estimated 2023/24 teachers’ pay award.

The number of responses to the question of what would your LA/AT generally consider to be affordable for all schools in your area in respect of any 2023/24 teachers' pay award
0 % 13 responses (13%)
0 – 0.99% 4 responses (4%)
1 – 1.99% 11 responses (11%)
2 – 2.99% 38 responses (37%)
3 – 3.99% 25 responses (25%)
4 -4.99% 3 responses (3%)
5%+  
Left Blank  8 responses (8%)

 

Q13. In the context to your answer to Question 11, how significant an impact on your budgets would any higher percentage uplift in relation to the teachers’ pay award for 2023/24 be?

The number of responses to the question of how significant an in impact on your budgets would any higher percentage uplift in relation to teachers' pay award for 2023/24 be?
Significant impact 83 responses (81%)
Moderate 15 responses (15%)
Little impact in 2023/24 due to the option to use of "one off" reserves  
No impact at all due to projected healthy budget  
Left Blank 4 responses (4%)

 

Q14. If there will be a moderate or significant impact in reforecasting of budgets, what changes are likely to be considered to balance the schools budget? Please select the top three.

The number of responses to the question if there will be a moderate or significant impact in reforecasting of budgets, what changes are likely to be considered.
Reduction in staffing – too early to say which roles 75 responses (25%)
Reduction in estate investment/IT/logistical budgets 57 responses (19%)
Reduction in enrichment activities 45 responses (15%)
Reduction in curriculum offer to pupils 38 responses (13%)
Reduction in teaching assistant roles 34 responses (11%)
Reduction in out of hours service (e.g.  breakfast/after schools’ clubs) 19 responses (6%)
Reduction in admin roles 11 responses (4%)
Reduction in teaching roles 9 responses (3%)
Reduction in pastoral support roles 9 responses (3%)
Left Blank 3 responses (1%)

 

Q15. SCHOOL FINANCES – Which, if any types of schools, are experiencing the greatest difficulty?

The number of responses to the question which, if any type of schools, are experiencing the greatest difficulty?
Primary  45 responses (44%)
Secondary 8 responses (8%)
Special Schools 18 responses (18%)
Alternative Provision  
Smaller Schools 25 responses (25%)
Left Blank 6 responses (6%)

 

Recruitment challenges

Secondary Recruitment

Q16. Are secondary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with recruitment of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

Where 1 is Not Difficult to Recruit and 5 is Most Difficult to Recruit to

The number of responses to the question of if secondary schools in your local authority area are currently experiencing difficulties in recruitment, from a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the most difficult
  1 2 3 4 5
Heads

7 responses

 (9%)

15 responses

 (19%)
26 responses

 (32%)

 
22 responses

(27%)
11 responses

(14%)
Senior Leadership 0 response (0) 26 responses (31%) 33 responses (39%) 19 responses (23%) 6 responses (7%)
Experienced Teachers

0 response (0)

9 responses

 (10%)

30 responses

 (35%)

24 responses

 (28%)
23 responses

(27%)
Early Careers Teachers

 5 responses (6%)

 21 responses (24%) 26 responses (30%) 24 responses (28%) 10 responses (12%)

 

Primary Recruitment

Q17. Are primary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with recruitment of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

Where 1 is Not Difficult to Recruit and 5 is Most Difficult to Recruit to

The number of responses to the question of are primary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with recruitment, from a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being most difficult
  1 2 3 4 5
Heads 5 responses

(6%)
11 responses

(13%)
24 responses

(28%)
27 responses

(31%)
20 responses

(23%)
Senior Leadership 4 responses

(5%)
21 responses

 (24%)
26 responses

(30%)
30 responses

(34%) 
6 responses

(7%)
Experienced Teachers 1 response

(1%) 
15 responses

(17%)
26 responses

(29%)
31 responses

(34%)
17 responses

(19%)
Early career teachers  11 responses

 (12%)
27 responses

(30%)
22 responses

(24%) 
20 responses

(22%)
10 responses (11 %)

 

Retention challenges

Secondary Retention

Q18. Are secondary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with retention of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

Where 1 is Not Difficult to Retain and 5 is Most Difficult to Retain

 The number of responses to the question are secondary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with retention, from a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being most difficult to retain
  1 2 3 4 5
Heads 11 responses

(14%)
27 responses (34%) 19 responses (24%) 15 responses (19%) 8 responses

(10%)
Senior Leadership

8 responses

(10%)

29 responses

(35%) 
25 responses

(30%)
16 responses

(19%)
6 responses

(7%)
Experienced Teachers 2 responses

(2%)
19 responses

(22%) 
35 responses

(41%)
19 responses

(22%)
11 responses

(13%)
Early Career Teachers 4 responses

(5%)
22 responses

(26%)
32 responses

(38%)
22 responses

( 26%)
4 responses

(5%)

 

Primary Retention

Q19. Are primary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with retention of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

Where 1 is Not Difficult to Retain and 5 is Most Difficult to Retain

The number of responses to the question about if primary schools in your local authority area are currently experiencing difficulties in retention of senior staff members, from a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the most difficult
  1 2 3 4 5
Heads 12 responses

(15%) 
25 responses (31% ) 21 responses (26%) 20 responses

(25%)
3 responses

(4%)
Senior Leadership 8 responses

(9%)
27 responses

(31%)
33 responses

(38%)
18 responses

(21%)

 
0 responses

(0%)

 
Experienced Teachers 3 responses

(3%)
21 responses

 (24%)
33 responses

(38%)
27 responses

(31%)

 
3 responses

(3%)
Early Careers Teachers 6 responses

(7%)
25 responses

(29%)
33 responses

(39%) 

 
19 responses

(22%)
2 responses

(2%)

 

General recruitment and retention challenges

Q20. How significant are the following factors for recruitment and retention challenges for schools?

Where 1 is Not Significant and 5 is Most Significant

The number of responses to the question of how significant are specific factors for recruitment and retention challenges for schools, from a range of 1 to 5 with 5 being the most significant
  1 2 3 4 5
Level of Pay 5 responses

(5%)
11 responses

(11%)

 
25 responses

(26%)
31 responses

(32%)
25 responses

(26%)
Workload 0 response

(0)

2 responses

(2%)

7 responses

(7%)
31 responses

(32%)
57 responses

(59%)
Wellbeing

0 response

 (0)

4 responses

(4%) 
16 responses

(16%)
42 responses

(43%)
35 responses

(36%)
OFSTED 3 responses

(3%)

17 responses

(18%)

33 responses

(35%)
26 responses

(28%) 
15 responses

(16%)
Levels of Deprivation 6 responses

 (6%)
27 responses

 (29%)
30 responses

(32%)
15 responses

(16%)
15 responses

(16%)

 

Q21. How significant are the following geographical factors for recruitment and retention challenges for schools?

Where 1 is Not Significant and 5 is Most Significant

The number of responses  to the question of how significant are the following geographical factors for recruitment and retention challenges for schools, from a range of 1 to 5 with 5 being the most significant
  1 2 3 4 5
Coastal Towns 22 responses

(34%)
4 responses

(6%)
11 responses

 (17%)
15 responses

(23%)
12 responses

(19%)
Rural Communities 14 responses

(20%)
6 responses

(8%)
12 responses

(17%)

 
25 responses

(35%)

 
14 responses

(20%)
Urban/Inner City 8 responses

(11%) 
17 responses

(24%)

 
21 responses

(30%) 
19 responses

(27%) 
6 responses

(8%)
Smaller Schools 5 responses

 (6%)
7 responses

(9%)
21 responses

(27%)
25 responses

(32%)
19 responses

(25%)

 

 

Broader structural reform with the existing scope of the strb

Q22. Does the current STPCD sufficiently recognise and support distinct career stages and roles?

The number of responses to the question does the current STPCD sufficiently recognise and support distinct career stages and roles?
Yes 58 responses (56 %)
No 44 responses (43%)
Left Blank 2 responses (1%)

 

 

Q23. Are there roles in your schools and organisations that do not currently fit into the STPCD framework that you would want to see?

The number of responses to the question are there roles in your school and organisations that do not currently fit into the STPCD framework
Yes 62 responses (61%)
No 37 responses (36%)
Left Blank 3 responses (3%)

 

Q24. If you indicated YES to Question 23, please select from the options below.

Please select all that apply.

The number of responses to the question if you have indicated YES to Question 23 please select from the options below
Chief Executive Officer 30 responses (17 %)
Executive Head 48 responses (28%)
Head of School 37 responses (21%)
Education Director 20 responses (12%)
Head of School Improvement 18 responses (10%)
Other 8 responses (5%)
Left Blank 12 responses (5%)

 

Q25. If you responded OTHER to Question 24, please explain below:

Q26. Do you want to see the UPR retained?

The number of responses to the question of do you want to see UPR retained?
Yes 68 responses (67%)
No 11 responses (11%)
Don't Know 22 responses (21%)
Left Blank 1 response (1%)

 

Q27. Does the current guidance setting out the criteria for Upper Pay Range teachers need to be reviewed?

The number of responses to the question of does the current guidance setting out the criteria for Upper Pay Range teachers need to be reviewed?
Yes 75 responses (73 %)
No 16 responses (16%)
Don't Know 10 responses (10%)
Left Blank 1 response (1%)

 

Q28. Does the current guidance on setting school leader pay need to be reviewed?

The number of responses to the question does the current guidance of setting school leader pay need to be reviewed
Yes 76 responses (74%)
No 20 responses (20%)
Don't Know 5 responses (5%)
Left Blank 1 response (1%)

 

Q29. If you chose YES in Question 28 please explain your reasons?

The number of responses to the question of if you chose YES to Question 28 please explain your reasons
To take into account current and emerging leadership models in schools 60 responses
To review the framework for setting leadership pay. 56 responses
To review the framework in which a Head Teacher can be paid over 25% of the range 43 responses
Left Blank 27 responses

 

Questions 30-32. From an employer perspective would your LA/AT want these changes in the STPCD?

The number of responses to the question from an employer perspective would your LA/AT want these changes in the STPCD
  No Yes Don't Know Left Blank
Ability of Upper Pay Range teachers to voluntarily move back to main pay range within the school they are currently working. 2 responses

(2%)
95 responses

(94%)
4 responses

(4%)
0 response

0
A review and reduction of salary safeguarding from 3 years 7 responses

 (7%)

 
86 responses

(84%) 
7 responses

(7%)

 
2 responses

(2%) 
Introduction of an apprentice pay range 18 responses

 (18%)
61 responses

(60%)

 
21 responses

(21%)
2 responses

(2%) 

 

 

School Finances and Affordability

(These questions focussed on impact, affordability, and budgeting)

You may wish to consider: c) The autumn statement announced that schools will receive £2bn in extra funding for 2023/24, which we understand to be new money for schools. The Institute for Fiscal Studies have said that it would allow schools to return to at least 2010 levels in real terms, representing a 4% increase in school funding for 2023-24. d) Balanced against the current and forecast rates of inflation, in particular, the potential further increases in energy costs and the future school support staff pay award for 2023 in the context of the current schools AT/LA budget position.

Q11. What is your LA/AT recommendations for schools to budget (expressed as an overall percentage uplift) – in respect of any estimated 2023/24 teachers’ pay award.

  • 0%
  • 0-0.99%
  • 1-1.99%
  • 2-2.99%
  • 3-3.99%
  • 4-4.99%
  • 5%+

Q12. What would your LA/AT generally consider to be affordable for all schools in your area (expressed as an overall percentage uplift) in respect of any estimated 2023/24 teachers’ pay award.

  • 0%
  • 0-0.99%
  • 1-1.99%
  • 2-2.99%
  • 3-3.99%
  • 4-4.99%
  • 5%+

Q13. In the context to your answer to Question 11, how significant an impact on your budgets would any higher percentage uplift in relation to the teachers’ pay award for 2023/24 be?

  • Significant impact
  • Moderate
  • Little impact in 2023/24 due to the option to use of “one off” reserves
  • No impact at all due to projected healthy budget

Q14. If there will be a moderate or significant impact in reforecasting of budgets, what changes are likely to be considered to balance the schools budget? Please select the top three.

  • Reduction in admin roles
  • Reduction in teaching assistant roles
  • Reduction in teaching roles
  • Reduction in pastoral support roles
  • Reduction in staffing – too early to say which roles
  • Reduction in curriculum offer to pupils
  • Reduction in out of hours service (e.g. breakfast/after schools clubs)
  • Reduction in enrichment activities
  • Reduction in estate investment/IT/logistical budgets

Q15. SCHOOL FINANCES – Which, if any types of schools, are experiencing the greatest difficulty?

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Special Schools
  • Alternative Provision
  • Smaller Schools

Recruitment Challenges:

Where 1 is Not Difficult to Recruit and 5 is Most Difficult to Recruit to

Secondary Recruitment

Q16. Are secondary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with recruitment of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

Primary Recruitment

Q17. Are primary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with recruitment of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

Retention challenges

Where 1 is Not Difficult to Retain and 5 is Most Difficult to Retain

Secondary Retention

Q18. Are secondary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with retention of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

Primary Retention

Q17. Are primary schools in your local authority area currently experiencing difficulties with retention of Heads, Senior Leadership, Experienced Teachers, Early Careers Teachers

GENERAL RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION CHALLENGES

Where 1 is Not Significant and 5 is Most Significant

Q20. How significant are the following factors for recruitment and retention challenges for schools?

  • Levels of pay
  • Workload
  • Wellbeing
  • OFSTED
  • Levels of Deprivation

Q21. How significant are the following geographical factors for recruitment and retention challenges for schools?

  • Coastal Towns
  • Rural Communities
  • Urban/Inner City
  • Smaller Schools

BROADER STRUCTURAL REFORM WITH THE EXISTING SCOPE OF THE STRB

Q22. Does the current STPCD sufficiently recognise and support distinct career stages and roles?

  • Yes
  • No

Q23. Are their roles in your schools and organisations that do not currently fit into the STPCD framework that you would want to see?

  • Yes
  • No

Q24. If you indicated YES to Question 23, please select from the options below.

Please select all that apply.

  • Chief Executive Officer
  • Executive Head
  • Head of School
  • Education Director
  • Head of School Improvement
  • Other

Q25. If you responded OTHER to Question 24, please explain.

Q26. Do you want to see the UPR retained?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don’t Know

Q27. Does the current guidance setting out the criteria for Upper Pay Range teachers need to be reviewed?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don’t Know

Q28. Does the current guidance on setting school leader pay need to be reviewed?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don’t Know

Q29. If you chose YES in Question 28 please explain your reasons?

  • To take into account current and emerging leadership models in schools
  • To review the framework for setting leadership page
  • To review the framework in which a Head Teacher can be paid over 25% of the range

Questions 30-32. From an employer perspective would your LA/AT want these changes in the STPCD?

Categories:

1. Ability of Upper Pay Range teachers to voluntarily move back to main pay range within the school they are currently working.

2. A review and reduction of salary safeguarding from 3 years

3. Introduction of an apprentice pay range

Options:

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don’t Know

Q33. If there are other changes that you would like to see included in future STPCDs that are not covered in Questions 30-32 please add.

Q34. What other factors should be considered in supporting an effective career path?

FURTHER INFORMATION

Q35. Is there any other financial data, or comments you wish to share.

Appendices